Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents Orange Honey Glazed Chicken Drumsticks

Are you looking for a killer new spring time barbeque recipe? There is nothing better than this sweet orange infused chicken drumstick dish.  Quick and simple, yet oh so tasty.

Enjoy them as an easy mid-week dinner with a side of rice and greens. But have some napkins ready, as they are bound to be a bit sticky!



Ingredients 

6 whole chicken drumsticks
Real Salt to taste
Fresh ground pepper to taste
4 tablespoons Sunburst Oranges orange marmalade
4 tablespoons Sunburst Oranges honey
2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds 
2 cloves of minced garlic
3 teaspoons of soy sauce
2 stalks of chopped green onions

Directions

Heat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. 
Wisk together the marmalade, honey, garlic and soy sauce.
Sprinkle drumsticks with salt and pepper.
Put chicken in a baking dish.
Bake 20 minutes. 
Brush chicken with sauce and cook 10 minutes more.
Brush with sauce again and cook until done.

Remove from oven, sprinkle with sesame seeds, green onions and serve immediately. Provide orange honey sauce to add if desired.

Enjoy!

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents: Netherlands’ Orange Festival

Every year, on the 30th of April, the Dutch people celebrate an Orange Festival, which they called "Queen's Day" (or Koninginnedag) with cultural music, free market, and general joviality. But this year's "Queen's Day" is different, because the festival was specially organized to honour Her Majesty Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands of her Silver Anniversary Jubilee. Being the 25th Anniversary of the Orange is the colour of the their Royal family. You can see that the Amsterdam’s streets, roads, parks and canals come alive in a sea of Orange. It is preferable if not mandatory to wear orange during this national event of the Amsterdam Orange Festival. 

Although Queen's Day is the national holiday celebrating the Queen's Birthday, a tradition begun initially to honour the previous Queen Juliana (the mother of current Queen Beatrix), it has been specifically related with the Royal Orange Celebration-the colour which splashes across the country-represents happiness, zest, success, and creativity, and also the hospitality of the Dutch people.

From 1890 to 2013, the day was known as Koninginnedag or Queen's Day. The holiday was first observed on 31 August 1885 as Prinsessedag or Princess's Day, the fifth birthday of Princess Wilhelmina, heir to the Dutch throne. On her accession, the holiday acquired the name Koninginnedag. When held on 31 August the holiday was the final day of school summer vacation, leading to its popularity among children. 

Following the accession of Wilhelmina's daughter Juliana in 1948, the holiday was moved to Queen Juliana's birthday on 30 April. Her daughter, Beatrix retained the celebration on 30 April after she ascended the throne in 1980, despite her actual birthday occurring on 31 January. Beatrix altered her mother's custom of receiving a floral parade near a Royal palace, instead choosing to visit different Dutch towns each year and join in the festivities along with her sons.

In 2009, the Queen was carrying out this custom in the city of Apeldoorn when Karst Tates attempted to attack her by trying to ram at the Royal family's bus with his car; instead he drove into a crowd of people who were watching the parade, and fatally crashed into a monument. Seven people in the crowd were killed, and the car's driver also died soon afterwards.

Queen Beatrix abdicated on Koninginnedag 2013 which led to the accession of the first King since the observance of the national holiday, King Willem-Alexander. As a result, the holiday became known as Koningsdag from 2014 and the celebration was shifted three days ahead to 27 April, the birthday of King Willem-Alexander.

Koningsdag is known for its nationwide "free market", at which many Dutch people sell their secondhand items. It is also an opportunity for "orange madness" or oranjegekte, for the national colour, when the normally strait-laced Dutch let down their hair, often dyed orange for the occasion.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? You don’t have to travel to the Netherlands, you can get them right on our website. A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Asks: What Do Oranges and Noodles Have In Common?

Chiyoda Seisakujo, an industry equipment manufacturer located in Takamatsu city, the capital of Kagawa prefecture, has been developing biogas plants since 2004. Two prefecture-owned technology research and development centers approached the company, asking to utilize udon noodle waste as an ethanol feedstock.


In 2012, the company developed a prototype bioethanol plant on its property. The company collected udon noodle scraps from a large local noodle manufacturer. “With 3,307 pounds of udon scraps, we can produce about 53 gallons of bioethanol,” said Testuo Ozaki, a representative at Chiyoda Seisakujo.

The company noticed that there was still a lot of residue after producing bioethanol from udon waste. By using its expertise, the company built a biogas plant and further fermented the residue to produce methane gas. With methane gas, the company can produce annually about 180 GWh of electric power. “We started selling electricity to our local Shikoku Power Electric Company in December 2013,” said Ozaki.

Ehime prefecture, bordering Kagawa prefecture on the east, is the number one producer of mandarin oranges in Japan. Over ten years ago, the prefecture developed a biomass utilization plan to reduce green gas emissions and industrial waste while promoting locally-produced energy for local consumption and creating environmental jobs.

In 2008, the prefecture, Ehime University, and Nippon Steel Engineering Company teamed up together, with a grant awarded from the Ministry of Environment, to run a pilot project to transform orange waste into biofuel.


Nippon Steel Engineering constructed an ethanol bio-refinery at an orange juice processing plant owned by Ehime Beverage Inc., which collects most of the oranges harvested in the prefecture.

“About 20,000 tons of oranges are processed for juice production, of which 50 percent ends up as waste including seed, peel, and segment membrane,” said Sadanomi Minakuchi, an environmental technology engineer at the prefecture’s environmental department.

“We produced 12,839 gallons of ethanol from the orange waste we collected in 2013. We only ran the plant for two months — November and December. In Ehime, we harvest mandarin oranges only in the fall and not throughout the year like in California,” continued Minakuchi.

The research team has been testing various applications for orange waste-based ethanol and inspecting types of power equipment which can withstand corrosion by ethanol gasoline blends.

“The cost of producing orange ethanol is currently about $6.42 per gallon while one gallon of gasoline is $4.45 per gallon in Japan. We won’t be able to compete against gasoline now, but our goal is to provide orange ethanol as vehicle fuels under the “Ehime” brand.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents: Orange Fried Ice Cream

As our regular readers know we feature a Tuesday recipe and normally it features one of our products.  We try to stay with something that is fresh and in season. Here is a sweet treat that is fun to make and great to eat.

Fried Ice Cream  

2 slices bread
1 large scoop of vanilla ice cream
Trim off bread crusts. Place a scoop of ice cream between bread (lay bread at angles to each other) mold into a ball, making sure to seal edges together. 

Saran wrap each and freeze overnight.



Fried Ice Cream Batter

2/3 cup milk
1 cup flour, sifted
2 tablespoon orange extract
3 tablespoon sugar
2 eggs
1 tablespoon melted butter
Blend together until smooth and creamy. You can make this ahead of time. Add milk to thin if needed. 

Orange Sauce

8 ounces butter
24 ounces orange juice 
1/8 teaspoon cloves
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4-3/4 cup sugar (according to taste)
1/8 cup orange extract
1/2 lemon grated rind 
1 orange grated rind only

Mix together and bring to a slow boil. Add cornstarch and water to thicken slightly. This can be made ahead of time and left in refrigerator to serve over the fried ice cream. 

Add enough oil to be about 3 inches deep in pot. Using an electric wok set on 400 degrees, otherwise, put heat on medium to medium high temperature. Unwrap breaded ice cream and dip in batter before putting it in hot oil. Fry until nicely brown. Don't brown too quickly. Fry one at a time.

Serve immediately with crushed strawberries, or a little of the orange sauce topping. You may sprinkle powdered sugar over the sauce and strawberries before serving.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Monday, March 23, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents: So You Think You Know Citrus

Here are some of the more interesting unusual citrus fruits that you may never have heard of. They include Nigerian Powder Flasks, Ortanique, Procimequat, Sinton and Yuzu.


Nigerian Powder Flasks (Afraegle paniculata) is part of a West African group of hard-shelled, citrus-like ball fruit. The trees can grow as high as sixteen feet and can be found in villages throughout Benin and Nigeria. The seeds are edible and contain an essential oil. The fruit is small, containing only eight segments which are full of seeds.

Ortanique (Citrus x nobilis) was discovered in Jamaica, as were its cousin the tangors (temple orange and ugli). The name is an amalgam of OR(ange)TAN(gerine)(un)IQUE. Climate affects the look, feel, and taste of this fruit dramatically. In tropical Jamaica, the fruit is seedless and a pale orange in colour, with juicy, sweet orange overtones and a thin rind. In Mediterranean Israel, the fruit has some seeds, a fairly thick rind, and a mid-orange colour. In semitropical Cyprus, is has a deep orange colour, many seeds, and a thicker rind.


Procimequat (Citrus aurantifolia) is a cross between the Eustic limequat and the Hong Kong kumquat. This small, round fruit grows in clusters on thorny branches with long deep green leaves. The smooth orange rind is soft and easy to tear. The flesh is dense and contains a few seeds and cotyledons. This is one of the fruits leading the study of true bigeneric backcrosses and a trigeneric hybrid, resulting in PRO(to)C(itrus)(L)imequat.

Sinton (Citrangequat) is an oval kumquat and rusk citrange hybrid that was first bred in Sinton, Texas. It is an attractive ornamental plant, with brightly coloured but highly acidic fruit. It has a tapered neck and a striking orange rind. The flesh is lemon yellow with a few seeds. The Sinton is harvested from December through March.


Yuzu (C. aurantium) is a distinctive hybrid citrus fruit, likely a variety of bitter orange. One of the most cold-resistant of the citrus fruits, it grows wild in Tibet and the interior of China. It is cultivated on a small scale in parts of China, but more so in Japan. 

The yuzu tree bears fruit from late autumn, and the sight of ripe golden yuzu suggests to the Japanese that winter is approaching. The fruit is the size of a mandarin orange and has a thick uneven skin and paler flesh containing many seeds. It smells something like a lime, but its fragrance is unique. 

The Japanese often wrap several of the fruits in cheesecloth and float them in a hot bath so they will give off a relaxing scent.



Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Friday, March 20, 2015

Is There Anything Better Than Fresh Orange Juice?

Juice Oranges might not be perfect or beautiful on the outside, but it's really what's on the inside that counts. Cartons can be purchased by a 20lb box or a 40lb box.

Why make your own fresh squeezed orange juice?

What happens with Industrially-produced orange juice, is after the oranges are squeezed, the juice is stored in giant holding tanks and the oxygen is removed from them.  This allows the liquid to keep for up to a year without spoiling. This makes the juice completely flavorless. Then the industry uses “flavor packs” to re-flavor the juice.

Fresh squeezed orange juice can be a good source of vitamins and other nutrients. Squeezing your own at home would be about the only way to get the real flavor and these nutrients.

40lb Carton Sunburst Juice Oranges perfect for home juicing.
Carton contains approx. 80-113 oranges  $20.00

20lb Carton Sunburst Juice Oranges perfect for home juicing.
Carton contains approx. 40-56 oranges  $10.00

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We have the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.



Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents The Houston Orange Show Center for Visionary Art

Houston postman Jeff McKissack created The Orange Show in honor of his favorite fruit and illustrate his belief that longevity results from hard work and good nutrition. Working in isolation from 1956 until his death in 1980, McKissack used common building materials and found objects — bricks, tiles, fencing, farm implements — to transform an East End lot into an architectural maze of walkways, balconies, arenas and exhibits decorated with mosaics and brightly painted iron figures.


When McKissack died, Houston arts patron Marilyn Oshman formed a non-profit foundation to preserve The Orange Show. The 21 original donors represent a diverse cross-section of Houston -- Dominique de Menil, Nina Cullinan, members of the legendary Texas rock band ZZ Top and East End funerary director Tommy Schlitzberger. In 1982, the restored site opened and newly hired staff began to integrate The Orange Show into Houston's cultural life through a wide variety of programs. Artists, musicians and literary figures that make Houston their home bring depth and dimension to programs, and give the public immediate access to creative thinking.  

Programs focus on the Orange Show's ability to make basic elements of art tangible and accessible. Dynamic events involve at risk youth in community enriching art projects -- to date 28 murals have been created under Orange Show auspices. A library and archive document visionary artists and environments. Outreach programs encourage the public to participate in the creative process; among the most successful of these is Art Car Weekend.

Attend the April 4th Easter Orange Hunt& PEEPS Art Contest. Bring the kids out for our annual Easter Orange Hunt! Let them loose in the colorful maze of the Orange Show Monument as they search for candy-filled eggs, oranges and other fun prizes! The Easter Orange Hunt will start at 11AM SHARP - please make sure to get to the Orange Show on time! But before you head out there, construct your very own marshmallowy masterpiece out of the beloved sugary candy PEEPS and participate in our Third Annual Houston PEEPS Art Contest! About the 3rd annual houston peeps art contest. The Houston PEEPS Art Contest is all about being creative! PEEPS Art Contests occur in many cities across the nation, but The Orange Show Center for Visionary Art is excited to bring the PEEPS Art Contest to Houston.

April 4th is also the day of the 28th Annual Houston Art Car Parade Kick Off Party for the Art Car Parade that is slated to take place on Saturday, April 11th along Allen Parkway and we can't wait to show off all the awesome new entries this year! Join us on Saturday April 4th, a week prior to the big day, for our Houston Art Car Parade Kickoff Party hosted by Texas Monthly and Saint Arnold Brewing Company! 

Live music in the Lindley Fish in Smither Park, bike decorating hosted by the Orange Show as well as photo-based kids crafts hosted by Houston Center for Photography, and of course Art Cars will make for a great way to kick off the 28th year of Houston Art Car Parade festivities! Bring your own bike to decorate at Smither Park during the Kickoff Party and you'll be able to join the Orange Show Art Bikes as they roll during the 28th Annual Houston Art Car Parade on Saturday, April 11th!

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Sunburst Oranges and Benefits For Your Skin

Oranges are the most popular among all the citrus fruits. This tangy fruit definitely impresses with its delicious juicy taste and its high concentration of vitamin C as well as other nutrients. Oranges are widely popular and account for about 70% of the world’s citrus production. Their amazing taste not only makes them a popular snack but also a major ingredient in several dishes. Even the orange peel contains volatile oil glands in pits which have several health benefits. Orange juice is widely used as a preservative as well as to impart flavor to various dishes.

Prevent Acne And Blackheads:

The high levels of vitamin A in oranges protects your skin from invading bacteria and viruses while vitamin C helps reduce skin swelling, thus minimizing the occurrence of pimples. Citric acid is a powerful exfoliating agent that can eliminate the dead skin cells and cleanse your pores, thus helping to prevent acne. You can prepare a face scrub from orange peels which have been dried in the sun for few days. Grind these into a fine powder. To prepare the face pack, combine ½ teaspoon of orange peel powder with 1 teaspoon yoghurt and add a few drops of lemon juice. Apply it on your face and allow it to dry. Rinse off with cold water.

Reduce Dark Spots and Blemishes

Orange peels have a higher content of vitamin C than the fruit itself. Instead of throwing away the peels, you can dry them in the sun and grind them to prepare orange peel powder. This can be used as a body scrub. You can mix the above scrub with milk and milk cream and apply it on your face. This will provide an instant glow to your face as well as reduce dark spots and blemishes on your skin.

Many Anti-Ageing Benefits

Oranges are a rich source of vitamin C which improves the skin texture and color. It also helps in restoring collagen in your body which is responsible for skin firming and prevents premature ageing of skin. Oranges contain powerful antioxidants which fight off oxygen free radicals. These free radicals are the common cause of wrinkles and sagging of cheeks.

Rejuvenates Dull Skin

You can make a refreshing face spray using orange peels. Alternatively, you can juice 2 oranges and put the juice in an ice cube tray. Rubbing these frozen orange cubes on your face will spruce up and brighten your dull and lackluster skin. It will refine your pores and control oiliness.

Experience Radiant Skin:

Instead of grinding the orange peels, you can simply pour boiling water on the peels and leave for a day. Filter this liquid the next day and refrigerate it. Apply this liquid on your face with cotton ball and leave it until it dries up. This will make your face firm and glowing.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Celebrates Saint Patrick’s Day

It is true that our recipes nearly always feature oranges, other citrus, honey, nuts or chocolate. But for St. Patrick’s Day we just had to do a Corned Beef and Cabbage recipe.

Corned Beef and Cabbage is a traditional St Patrick's Day recipe that is far too good to pass-up and is eaten all the time, after all it is one of Ireland's National Dishes.

Corned Beef and Cabbage

Recipe makes 5 servings

Ingredients

3 pounds corned beef brisket with spice packet

10 small red potatoes

5 carrots, peeled and cut into 3-inch pieces

1 large head cabbage, cut into small wedges

Directions

Place corned beef in large pot or Dutch oven and cover with water. Add the spice packet that came with the corned beef. Cover pot and bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Simmer approximately 50 minutes per pound (150 minutes for three pounds) or until tender.

Add whole potatoes and carrots, and cook until the vegetables are almost tender. Add cabbage and cook for 15 more minutes. Remove meat and let rest 15 minutes.

Place vegetables in a bowl and cover. Add as much broth (cooking liquid reserved in the Dutch oven or large pot) as you want. Slice the corned beef across the grain.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy. Direct from our trees to your home.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Monday, March 16, 2015

Sunburst Oranges – Citrus Farmers Face Many Problems This Year

Farmers face many problems in raising crops and keeping a position so they can grow from year to year. The drought and shipping issues are just two of them facing the California growers. 



The battle against the spread of the deadly citrus disease Huanglongbing and the insect vector Asian Citrus Psyllid continues. It is being fought on a much broader plain in Southern California where the industry funds nearly $15 million in an extensive trapping, treating, and outreach program. That information is updated constantly. 

Challenges on food safety, labor, regulations and regulatory costs, water, crop protection tools and trade are just a few elements in our portfolio. For our friends in the general public I urge you to take a look at the public resources on the Government and Industry stories in the news. 

The withering drought that has turned California rivers and reservoirs to dust now threatens to devastate the agriculture business in the country’s top farming state. President Barack Obama on Friday pledged millions of dollars in federal assistance to the state during a visit to Fresno, the biggest city in the state's once-lush San Joaquin Valley.

"The truth of the matter is that this is going to be a very challenging situation this year, and frankly, the trend lines are such where it's going to be a challenging situation for some time to come," Obama said Friday during a meeting with local leaders in Firebaugh, Calif., a rural enclave not far from Fresno.

Obama promised to make $100 million in livestock-disaster aid available within 60 days to help the state rebound from what the White House's top science and technology adviser has called the worst dry spell in 500 years.

For the farmers in a state that produces a third of the country’s fruits and vegetables, the help couldn't come soon enough. "It's really a crisis situation," Kenneth McDonald, city manager in drought-ravaged Firebaugh in Fresno County told NBC News. "And it's going to get worse in time if this drought doesn't alleviate." 

The President's Column coveys the views and opinions from the California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen, on current topics affecting CCM members and the industry. For the producer members they try to refresh and/or update the information you need to profit from your farming efforts. Whether it be the market memo and its information, the weather station information or comments on issues directly affecting you it's all here for your review. 

Education, information and advocacy on behalf of this $2 Billion industry are our charge. The website is designed for several different audiences, more than growers and the general public. It is here to help the many different segments of our society and hopefully each will find something of value. 

Yes, it is a challenging time for industry. These challenges when addressed properly become pathways toward a solution set that can positively affect the industry. The citrus industry's ability to work together is our strength. The track record as an industry farmer and our industry's track record as an agricultural leader are proven. 

Looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Friday, March 13, 2015

Sunburst Oranges – We’re Sure Chocolate and Oranges Are The Perfect Match

With the theme “Chocolate and Oranges, The Perfect Match” we added Chocolates to our website sunburstoranges.com.

We didn’t add just any chocolate. Not here at Sunburst Oranges.  We pride ourselves on having the very finest Navel Oranges. Our Citrus is grown in the richest soils of California in the San Joaquin Valley.

We accepted no less than the very best in chocolates. We were very fortunate to have some of the very finest chocolate from right here in Porterville, Califiornia. Those very special chocolate confections are from Stafford’s Famous Chocolates.

Stafford’s Famous Chocolates presents a tempting array of luscious confections sure to please everyone’s palate. Their mouth-watering truffles, caramels, English toffees, creams, and countless delectable chocolates are handmade daily. 

Only the freshest and finest ingredients are used to create all of Stafford’s Famous Chocolates. Their nuts are locally grown, and the fruits they use are also grown right here in the San Joaquin Valley. Of course Sunburst Oranges are involved.


Much like Sunburst Oranges Stafford’s Famous Chocolates is a family owned business. They have two locations. Their original store is in the city of Porterville in the Central Valley of California and their newest store is in Los Olivos, California located on the central coast in the Santa Ynez wine country.

Here is what one of their customer had to say about their fine chocolates.

“I have never had chocolate like this before and I have had chocolate all over the world. Freshest, most delicious milk and dark chocolate. The Old Fashioned Pecan Turtles and their English Toffee are to die for. Would recommend Stafford’s to anyone. Prices are very reasonable as well. ~ 
Robert T.”

With Stafford’s you’ll see a huge difference between hand-made and machine made chocolate. Factories that make machine made chocolate produce their chocolate by quantity instead of the highest  quality. 

At Stafford’s they pride themselves in knowing that their customers will be receiving their freshest, highest quality of chocolate where each chocolate piece is hand-dipped to perfection in small batches.

Looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Thursday, March 12, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Presents The History Of Chocolate

The history of chocolate begins in Mesoamerica. Chocolate, the fermented, roasted, and ground beans of the Theobroma cacao, can be traced to the Mokaya and other pre-Olmec people, with evidence of chocolate beverages dating back to 1900 BC. The Aztecs believed that cacao seeds were the gift of Quetzalcoatl, the God of wisdom, and the seeds had so much value they were used as a form of currency. Originally prepared only as a drink, chocolate was served as a bitter, frothy liquid, mixed with spices, wine or corn puree. It was believed to have aphrodisiac powers and to give the drinker strength.

After its arrival in Spain in the sixteenth century, sugar was added to it and it became popular through Europe, first among the ruling classes and then among the common people. In the 20th century, chocolate was considered a staple, essential in the rations of United States soldiers at war.

Cultivation, use, and cultural elaboration of cacao were early and extensive in Mesoamerica, to which the cacao tree is native.[4] When pollinated, the flower of the cacao tree eventually forms a kind of sheath, or ear, 20" long hanging from the branches. Within the sheath are 30 to 40 brownish-red almond-shaped beans embedded in a sweet viscous pulp. While the beans themselves are bitter due to the alkaloids within them, the sweet pulp may have been the first element consumed by humans. Evidence suggests that it may have been fermented and served as an alcoholic beverage as early as 1400 BC.[5]

While researchers do not agree which Mesoamerican culture first domesticated the cacao tree, the use of the fermented bean in a drink seems to have arisen in Central America. Scientists have been able to confirm its presence in vessels around the world by evaluating the "chemical footprint" detectable in the microsamples of contents that remain.[1] Ceramic vessel with residues from the preparation of chocolate beverages have been found at archaeological sites dating back to the Early Formative (1900-900 BC) period. For example, one such vessel found at an Olmec archaeological site on the Gulf Coast of Veracruz, Mexico dates chocolate's preparation by pre-Olmec peoples as early as 1750 BC. On the Pacific coast of Chiapas, Mexico, a Mokaya archaeological site provides evidence of cacao beverages dating even earlier, to 1900 BC.

Earliest evidence of domestication of the cacao plant dates to the Olmec culture from the Preclassic period. The Olmecs used it for religious rituals or as a medicinal drink, with no recipes for personal use. Little evidence remains of how the beverage was processed.

The Mayan people, by contrast, do leave some surviving writings about cacao which confirm the identification of the drink with the gods. The Dresden Codex specifies that it is the food of the rain deity Kon, the Madrid Codex that gods shed their blood on the cacao pods as part of its production. The consumption of the chocolate drink is also depicted on pre-Hispanic vases. The Mayans seasoned their chocolate by mixing the roasted cacao seed paste into a drink with water, chile peppers and cornmeal, transferring the mixture repeatedly between pots until the top was covered with a thick foam.

By 1400, the Aztec empire took over a sizable part of Mesoamerica. They were not able to grow cacao themselves, but were forced to import it. All of the areas that were conquered by the Aztecs that grew cacao beans were ordered to pay them as a tax, or as the Aztecs called it, a "tribute". The cacao bean became a form of currency. The Spanish conquistadors left records of the value of the cacao bean, noting for instance that 100 beans could purchase a canoe filled with fresh water or a turkey hen. The Aztecs associated cacao with the god Quetzacoatl, whom they believed had been condemned by the other gods for sharing chocolate with humans. Unlike the Maya of Yucatán, the Aztecs drank chocolate cold. It was consumed for a variety of purposes, as an aphrodisiac or as a treat for men after banquets, and it was also included in the rations of Aztec soldiers.

Pueblo people, who lived in an area that is now the U.S. Southwest, imported cacao from Mesoamerican cultures in southern Mexico or Central America between 900 and 1400. They used it in a common beverage consumed by everyone in their society.

So if you are looking for fine chocolate to feed your sweet addiction Sunburst Oranges is the place.  http://www.sunburstoranges.com/#!luscious-confections/c211k

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Safe Methods To Store And Preserve Oranges

Fresh, juicy oranges aren't the most perishable of fruit, but they can begin to lose some of their charm in as little as a week. If you've invested in a large quantity of the fruit, or have the good fortune to enjoy a backyard orange tree, that might sometimes mean you've got more than you can conveniently use while they're still at their best. They can be canned, dried or turned into jam, but you may not know that freezing an orange is a better way to preserve their fresh flavor.

Freezing Preparation

Wash your hands, utensils and work surfaces scrupulously before you start, to minimize the risk of cross-contamination. Oranges aren't prone to carrying bacteria, but once cut -- like other foods -- are susceptible to infection from outside.

Wash the oranges carefully under cold running water, using no soap or bleach. Dry them carefully with fresh paper towels and lay them on a clean cutting board.

Peel the oranges and separate them into segments, or slice them crosswise into rounds. For a finished, professional appearance, cut the peel and outer membrane from the oranges with a sharp knife to reveal the colorful flesh. Cut away the segments from their membranes, leaving the membrane-free flesh -- called "supremes" by chefs -- cleaned and ready to use.

Dry Packing

Count enough freezer-safe canning jars or food-grade plastic containers to hold your oranges. Wash and rinse them in plenty of hot, soapy water, then dry them with clean paper towels.

Pack the orange segments or slices tightly into each container, arranging them carefully to exclude as much air as possible. The less oxygen can reach the segments, the longer they'll retain their quality.
Seal the jars or containers, leaving 1/2 inch of headspace to allow for the oranges to expand as they freeze.

Arrange the jars or containers in a single layer, distributing them evenly around your freezer. This speeds the freezing process, helping maintain the oranges' texture and quality.

Syrup Style

Prepare a heavy, canning-style syrup by boiling 2 parts sugar to 3 parts water, by volume. The syrup should be at refrigerator temperature when you use it, to speed freezing, so do this step ahead of time. Pack your orange slices or segments into freezer-safe canning jars or food-safe plastic containers.

Pour cold syrup over the oranges until they're submerged, leaving 1/2 to 3/4 inch of headspace to allow for expansion when they're frozen. Add crumpled wax paper to the top of the jar to submerge the oranges and seal the container.

Arrange the jars or containers in your freezer, leaving plenty of space between them where air can circulate and chill the contents quickly.

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257

559-561-3391

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Used In Irish Orange Pudding

With Saint Patrick’s Day just a week away we are continuing our use of oranges in traditional Irish recipes.

A tangy pudding that will delight your taste buds. Even if you aren’t Irish.

Ingredients

2. sticks of Kerry Irish Gold butter, plus extra regular butter for greasing
4 tablespoons of raw sugar
3 Sunburst Navel Oranges, peeled, pith removed and segmented
1 orange, peeled, pith removed and thinly sliced
1 cup self-raising flour
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1 cup all-purpose flour and increase the baking powder to 2 teaspoon)
1 ½ cups superfine sugar
2 eggs
3 teaspoons of milk
1 cup heavy cream
Fresh seeds from 1 vanilla bean pod 

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit Grease an ovenproof dish or cake tin with a diameter of about 8 inches with a little regular butter.

Melt one stick of the Kelly Irish Gold butter in a saucepan over a low heat, add the raw sugar and cook until slightly caramelized. Then add the orange segments and cook over a medium heat for 6 to 8 minutes until the oranges begin to caramelized.

Arrange the orange slices in the bottom of your ovenproof dish and pour over the caramelized oranges and sauce.

Sift the flour and baking powder into a bowl. In a separate bowl, beat together the remaining butter and caster sugar until fluffy and light. It is important that the mixture is well beaten, so don’t rush at this stage. Add the eggs, one by one, with a little of the sifted flour. Fold the remaining flour into the batter and mix in the milk.

Spoon the mixture over the oranges and bake for 30 to 40 minutes until the sponge is golden.
Pour the cream into a bowl, add the vanilla seeds, then whip the cream. Serve the pudding hot or cold with the vanilla cream.

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Monday, March 9, 2015

How Safe Are Farmer’s Markets?

We all love fresh produce, fruits and the yummy treats we find at our local farmer’s markets. Have you ever considered how safe the products might be?  Setting out in the open air and being handled by many different people.  Here is a study that opened our eyes.

Researchers in Chapman University’s Food Science Program and their collaborators at University of Washington have just published a study on the presence of Salmonella and E. coli on certain products sold at farmers’ markets. The study focused on farmers’ markets in Los Angeles and Orange counties in California, as well as in the Seattle, Washington, area. Of the 133 samples tested from 13 farmers’ markets, 24.1 percent tested positive for E. coli and one sample tested positive for Salmonella.

“While farmers’ markets can become certified to ensure that each farmer is actually growing the commodities being sold, food safety is not addressed as part of the certification process.


Hellberg and her research team visited 49 different vendors at 13 farmers’ markets in Los Angeles and Orange Counties in California, and in the greater Seattle area collecting 133 samples between the period of July and October 2013. Each sample was equivalent to one pound and was tested that same day for both Salmonella and E. coli using methods from the United States Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual.


A total of 16 samples had average E. coli counts considered to be unsatisfactory according to guidelines established by the Public Health Laboratory Service. When tested for Salmonella, 15 samples had suspicious growth but only one tested positive, a parsley sample from a Los Angeles County farmers’ market.


Orange County farmers’ markets had the highest percentage of samples with E. coli growth followed by farmers’ markets in the greater Seattle area and Los Angeles County.


Salmonella symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramps and fever around 12 to 72 hours after consumption that can last four to seven days. Symptoms for pathogenic forms of E. coli include severe stomach cramps, diarrhea that often becomes bloody, and vomiting.


According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service, farmers’ markets have been increasing since 2009 near urban areas, particularly along the East and West Coasts. In August 2013, there were more than 8,000 farmers’ markets listed in the USDA’s National Farmers’ Market directory.


The study was published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.


Consistently ranked among the top universities in the West, Chapman University provides a uniquely personalized and interdisciplinary educational experience to highly qualified students. Their programs encourage innovation, creativity and collaboration, and focus on developing global citizen-leaders who are distinctively prepared to improve their community and their world. Visit www.chapman.edu


If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.


Presented By:

Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Friday, March 6, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Gift Packs

Medium Super Citrus Saver
18 California Sweet Navel Oranges delivered to your door at no additional shipping costs. $21.95

Large Super Citrus Saver
24 California Sweet Navel Oranges delivered to your door at no additional shipping costs. $29.95

Can ship anywhere in the US including Military Bases...........Send a little Sunshine to Support Our Troops.

Are you looking for the perfect gift for business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We have the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.




Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Are The Fruit Of The Gods

At least in an ancient Greek myth tells that oranges were known as the fruits of the Gods. They were often referred as the ‘golden apples’ that Hercules stole as part of his quest.

The Garden of the Hesperides, Atlas' daughters, was Hera's orchard in the far western corner of the world, where either a single tree or a grove of trees bearing immortality-giving golden apples grew. Hera placed in the garden a never-sleeping, hundred-headed dragon (named Ladon) as an additional safeguard. The 11th Labor of Hercules was to steal the golden apples from the garden. He stole the apples by asking Atlas to steal the apples and in return he would hold up the sky for him. After Atlas picked the apples Hercules asked Atlas to hold up the sky for him while he made a pad of the lion skin. He never took back his job of holding up the sky and ran away.

Why do we think that the golden apples were really oranges? In many languages, the orange is referred to as a "golden apple". For example, the Greek χρυσομηλιά, and Latin pomum aurantium both literally describe oranges as "golden apples". Other languages, like German, Finnish, Hebrew, and Russian, have more complex etymologies for the word "orange" that can be traced back to the same idea and root of the word related to apple.

In later years it was thought that the "golden apples" of myth might have actually been oranges, a fruit unknown to Europe and the Mediterranean before the Middle Ages. Under this assumption, the Greek botanical name chosen for all citrus species was Hesperidoeidē (Ἑσπεριδοειδῆ, "hesperidoids"). It was also used by Carl Linnaeus, who gave the name Hesperidesto an order containing the genus Citrus, in allusion to the golden apples of the Hesperides, and is preserved in the term Hesperidium for the fruits of citrus and some other plants.

One reason why oranges might be considered to be "magical" in so many stories is because they bear flowers and fruit at the same time, unlike any other non-citrus fruit.

In Ancient Rome citrus fruits such as Oranges and Lemons were little known if at all although opinions differ. For example there are frescos on walls in Pompeii depicting fruits that look rather like oranges. They would have in any case been seen as an exotic fruit rather than being in common use.

Have you wanted to know: which came first, orange the fruit or orange the color? Both scenarios are plausible, but in the case of orange, the color was named after the fruit. (Have we lost you yet?)

Unlike the chicken, we can follow the etymological trail, and know with certainty that the fruit came first -- by 300 years no less. The first instance of the word in Anglo manuscript, "pume orange," dates back to the 13th century (and it was adapted from old French "pomme d'orenge" ). And the first use of the word to describe the color is first noted in the 16th century.

If it weren't for orange (the fruit) we would probably know the color as geolurēad (yellow-red). That's just one more reason to appreciate the wonderful orange fruit.

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

How to Truly Enjoy A Sunburst Navel Orange

I know that over the past year or so we have talked a lot about oranges, but we thought it was time to talk directly about the best way to really, really enjoy a fresh Sunburst Navel Orange.  

First; purchase them this time of year (winter) directly from our website: sunburstoranges.com

Store overnight in your refrigerator

Second; slice one vertically into for quarters or eights

Break the slices apart and place on a shiny clean white plate (they just look best that way)

If you can wait, set down in a nice comfortable chair

Third; Enjoy

Take a slice and turn sideways so it just fits crossways into your mouth… bite down and let the cold juice dribble down your chin. Some of us live dangerously and add just a lite dusting of Real Salt before we bite in.

Continue to enjoy until your plate is empty

You have just had the world’s best, healthiest and tastiest snack for less than one-hundred calories

Feel free to repeat as often as necessary

Next:

OK, let’s not waste those orange peels… Make Fire Starters: The oil in orange peels is very volatile, and you use this to your advantage by making your own fire starters. Squeeze the oil of orange peels onto a bundle of drier lint. To start a fire while out camping, or in a wood burning fireplace put some dried orange peels or your special lint with small kindling under the larger dried logs. Within a few minutes you will have a nice warm and crackling fire.

Now is the time to think of marshmallows or s’mores

Whether eaten alone as a snack or creatively prepared in a recipe, oranges boast a wealth of nutritious benefits. This juicy and sweet fruit provides over 100% of the daily value for vitamin C making it an immune-boosting superfood. Oranges are a good source of B vitamins like B1 and folate for proper brain development, potassium to maintain electrolyte balance, calcium for healthy teeth and bones, and over 170 antioxidants. 

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Sunburst Oranges Offers An Irish Burnt Orange Recipe

With Saint Patrick’s Day just two weeks away we thought that now would be a good time to introduce the use of oranges in a traditional Irish recipe.

Ingredients

2 large Sunburst Navel Orange
1/2 cup sweet white wine
1 Tablespoon butter
8 Tablespoons granulated sugar
1 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
2 Tablespoons of warmed whiskey

Directions

Carefully peel oranges thinly.

With sharp knife remove as much of the pith and white skin as possible keeping the orange segments intact.

Cut the thin peel into fine strips and cover with wine.

Put peeled orange segments into an ovenproof dish.

Put butter on top of each one pressing it down gently then sprinkle each with one teaspoon sugar.

Put into a 400 degree (Fahrenheit) oven for ten minutes or until sugar caramelizes.

Meanwhile mix orange juice with sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil.

Lower heat and let it get syrupy without stirring.

Add orange peel and wine mixture then bring to boil again.

Cook rapidly to reduce and thicken slightly.

Take oranges from oven and if not fully browned put under a moderate broiler for a few minutes.

Pour warmed whisky over them and set it alight over heat.

As the flames die down add the orange syrup and let simmer for two minutes.

Serve at once. It can be served cold later.

If you are looking for the perfect wholesome gift for a business associates, family or friends? A quick visit to http://sunburstoranges.com can solve all of your fresh gift giving adventures. We sell only the finest selections and the freshest citrus you can buy.

Presented By:
Sunburst Oranges
180 South “E” Street
Porterville, CA  93257
559-561-3391